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lorenz0
04-05-2011, 03:23 AM
So I decided to get a larger tank for my condo but I am in need of some advice

My building is 6 years old and it has a wood frame structure. I am on the 2nd floor and I am a bit worried about weight, last thing I need is to get a phone call that my neighbor below me has a newly acquired fish tank. I have no idea how the support beams run, I emailed the condo board asking for more info and how much dead weight one spot can take. Now where I want the tank I highly doubt its a load bearing wall (separates my room and the rest of the apartment).

I want a 60" long tank to fill the void where my tv used to be. So without having to big of a tank and now worrying the dimensions I have come up with is 60x16x16 and I have calculated it at about 850-900 pounds once everything is in it, including sump and ATO tank.

The cube I have now weights about 400-450 but it is on a load bearing wall. but it is only being distributed on a 30x20 surface area.

Think I will be ok? planning on putting a DP on the tank late this month but I need some peace of mind first

intarsiabox
04-05-2011, 03:43 AM
The best advice I can give you is to check with your condo board first.

Harpo
04-05-2011, 04:12 AM
The best advice I can give you is to check with your condo board first.


I second that motion!

lorenz0
04-05-2011, 04:26 AM
Email has been sent out, just waiting to see what they have to say

steve fedyk
04-05-2011, 04:59 AM
Most newer buildings are designed to hold 250 lbs per square foot, anywhere on the floor. If your wall you wont to put the tank on the outside of your place you should have no problems. Most condos are the same floor plan up and down, so if you put it next to the wall there should be a wall right below your wall.
If you build your own stand line it with rubber to catch any spills. Thats what I did and work pretty good.

lorenz0
04-05-2011, 09:00 AM
Thanks, thats exactly what I have been thinking.

This system will be set up identical to my 60gal, in over 2 years I never had a flood. Only thing I need to consider is the volume of water that is in my overflow and making sure that it will fit into my sump once the pump turns off. Will be installing a check valve on the return again. And of course buying insurance this time. But I like the liner Idea, could always seal the bottom just in case though.

But I have been thinking tonight and might bump it down a foot to being another 48" long tank. Which will drop the weight down by about 150 pounds of dead weight. Plus t5 bulbs are more accessible

sphelps
04-05-2011, 01:41 PM
Most newer buildings are designed to hold 250 lbs per square foot, anywhere on the floor. If your wall you wont to put the tank on the outside of your place you should have no problems. Most condos are the same floor plan up and down, so if you put it next to the wall there should be a wall right below your wall.
If you build your own stand line it with rubber to catch any spills. Thats what I did and work pretty good.
Not sure if that's accurate, as far I know the typical load limits for residential is 40lbs/sqft. But this is based on room size, so if the room is 10' x 10' then it can safely support up to 4000lbs total. This is typically just a rule of thumb and more for the upper limit you should never exceed. For something more accurate you need to know the type, size, spacing and span of the floor joists as well as how they are supported. However a tank that size won't be a problem. If it was me I would also secure the stand into the wall at half load even if it's not load bearing, this will help distribute the load better.

phi delt reefer
04-05-2011, 02:07 PM
Not sure if that's accurate, as far I know the typical load limits for residential is 40lbs/sqft. But this is based on room size, so if the room is 10' x 10' then it can safely support up to 4000lbs total. This is typically just a rule of thumb and more for the upper limit you should never exceed. For something more accurate you need to know the type, size, spacing and span of the floor joists as well as how they are supported. However a tank that size won't be a problem. If it was me I would also secure the stand into the wall at half load even if it's not load bearing, this will help distribute the load better.

is the 40lb rating for an "unsupported" span? I weight 230lbs and could stand in a space that one foot square with no flex in my floor but i have joists every 16 or 24" (whatever minimum code is).

I would also apply a sheet of 3/4" plywood to the bottom of the stand to distribute the wieight over the entire footprint vs. contact points of the legs. You could also oversize the stand (ie. make it 6" bigger on all sides of the tank) to reduce the lbs/sqft.

sphelps
04-05-2011, 02:48 PM
is the 40lb rating for an "unsupported" span? I weight 230lbs and could stand in a space that one foot square with no flex in my floor but i have joists every 16 or 24" (whatever minimum code is).

I would also apply a sheet of 3/4" plywood to the bottom of the stand to distribute the wieight over the entire footprint vs. contact points of the legs. You could also oversize the stand (ie. make it 6" bigger on all sides of the tank) to reduce the lbs/sqft.
The 40lbs/sqft is based on room size and the total weight a given size room has to handle at a minimum. I also believe it's based on dead weight and not live weight.

If you have a solid floor the plywood isn't needed, but if you have tile or carpet it can be a good idea however it could make it harder to level. Typically I usually go with an extruded perimeter on the base which essentially does the same thing but it'll be more stable and easier to level.

toytech
04-05-2011, 09:57 PM
Get about 6 of your freinds to stand in the spot your thinking about putting your tank , get the to bounce up and down on the floor and see if you can feel it move ( or if your bottom neibour ends up with a skylight ) . Also your condo board should be able to tell you how much weight the floor can handle , as well as if you are even alowed a tank that big .

CaptainYooh
04-06-2011, 05:33 AM
Some condominium corporation By-Laws have specific pet prohibition provisions limiting the number and size of pets homeowners/residents are allowed to keep in their homes. Sometimes these provisions include limitations on aquarium sizes. It's not only the physical design and structural load capacity that is a concern but also a risk of corporation's liability for potential mold and leaks that's the reason for such limitations. A letter to the Board of Directors c/o your Property Manager asking for their permission/clearance is the right thing to do in this case.

patman
04-06-2011, 04:29 PM
Not sure on your weight calculations. 1 gallon of water is like 10 lbs. Your 60" tank sounds like about 130 gallons so about 1300 lbs just for the display tank water. I know there isn't that much water as rocks and substrate displace it, but they also add to the weight. Then add in the tank weight, sump, equipment, ..... My place was rated for only 75lbs/ft so I ended up re-enforcing the floor between the joists to spread out the weight. Best if you can do it near a load bearing wall.

lorenz0
04-06-2011, 05:20 PM
A 120 is 24x24x48 and if you do a simple volume calculation its about 4/6 the volume of a 120gal

But I still haven't heard from my condo board. And yes after buying my apartment I found out all about the bylaws here. Only small dogs, no reptiles/exotic pets (still don't know if SW tanks fall under this) and nothing that can endanger other residents.

btw having 6 friends jumping on the same spot is different. thats only a short period of time of pressure.

sphelps
04-06-2011, 05:29 PM
Sounds like the condo board will likely be against aquariums all together, if they don't even allow reptiles and nothing that will endanger other residents they'll likely throw the water damage card despite what the floor can hold. If it was me I would have kept it on the down low, since you had nothing actually stating that aquariums were not allowed you would be fine even if disaster struck. If they come back now stating not allowed you're screwed. Oh well, hope it works out.

lorenz0
04-06-2011, 08:30 PM
Fish tanks are allowed but they don't have a size restriction

starting to think this won't happen by the lack of response from the condo board

sphelps
04-06-2011, 09:09 PM
I doubt the condo board would even have a clue what the load limits would be. Honestly that tank isn't large enough to raise any concerns relating to building structure.

CaptainYooh
04-06-2011, 09:26 PM
The Board of Directors consists of other homeowners just like you; they will not take a responsibility of attempting to verify the load capacity by themselves, naturally. They would either say no right away (because that's the simplest and safest response) or defer the question to the Property Manager, who, in turn, would most likely revert it back to you and request that you must provide a verification by a Professional Engineer that your proposed aquarium would not pose any structural risks to the building. If you have any friends that are civil engineers qualified to do structural calculations you may wanna talk to them about getting such verification in advance. Hope it helps.

spawn
04-07-2011, 03:27 AM
Dude where in the hell did your T.V. go? The R.P. is now kickin Ass. Thanks again.So I decided to get a larger tank for my condo but I am in need of some advice

My building is 6 years old and it has a wood frame structure. I am on the 2nd floor and I am a bit worried about weight, last thing I need is to get a phone call that my neighbor below me has a newly acquired fish tank. I have no idea how the support beams run, I emailed the condo board asking for more info and how much dead weight one spot can take. Now where I want the tank I highly doubt its a load bearing wall (separates my room and the rest of the apartment).

I want a 60" long tank to fill the void where my tv used to be. So without having to big of a tank and now worrying the dimensions I have come up with is 60x16x16 and I have calculated it at about 850-900 pounds once everything is in it, including sump and ATO tank.

The cube I have now weights about 400-450 but it is on a load bearing wall. but it is only being distributed on a 30x20 surface area.

Think I will be ok? planning on putting a DP on the tank late this month but I need some peace of mind first

Ryan
04-07-2011, 04:00 AM
You guys forget the floor isnt just going to give out. Your going to see the flex slowly before it gives way.

Harpo
05-14-2011, 04:34 AM
So what was the outcome??? :question:

lorenz0
05-14-2011, 04:46 AM
decided against it for now. The last month has proven to be a bit challenging financially so I went the opposite route and down graded lol

Worked better in the end but all will work out by october and than I will reconsider this idea next spring.