PDA

View Full Version : Level 3 Watering Restrictions for Greater Vancouver


byee
07-21-2015, 08:22 AM
All this GREAT weather in Vancouver has come with a price.

http://vancouver.ca/home-property-development/about-the-watering-restrictions.aspx

In response to the level 3 watering restrictions, what are your plans with the waste water from making RODI water?

Letting it run down the drain or saving it for watering the garden?

Feel free to share your other uses with the waste water.

Thanks

albert_dao
07-21-2015, 05:40 PM
You can use it for your FW water changes, or dump it on your yard where it will end up back in the environment... Or drink it. It's free of chlorine. Just don't let it go down the drain and into sewage treatment :)

Reef Pilot
07-21-2015, 05:55 PM
Maybe it's time they started thinking about upgrading our source water supply infrastructure so we don't have to go through this every year. When is the last time they added a major source supply? And how much has our lower mainland population increased since then?

We live in the wettest climate in Canada, and there is no shortage of nearby lakes full of water despite the low winter snow pack,... and now with our 3 month drought. And this won't be the last time we have a summer drought or low winter snow pack.

saltcreep
07-21-2015, 06:44 PM
Reef Pilot, I agree that it's time to begin looking at increasing our water source, but the fact still remains that we need to deal with the situation that is present now. Our water supply is not infinite as some may believe. Like most things, people need to take a hard look at their daily habits and alter them accordingly. A little bit here and there will go a long way.

I use my waste water in the garden as well as water from my freshwater tank from water changes.

Reef Pilot
07-21-2015, 06:51 PM
I agree, but if we need water restrictions now just to get through the summer, maybe they should get moving on some longer term plans. Like I said, our population and water usage will continue to grow. If they don't add supply, water restrictions won't be enough in the future. And again, there is no shortage of nearby water supply they could tap into. Just raising a couple dams (Seymour first) would be a good start. These projects take many years (even decades when you have to go through the approval process), so we need to start now.

Reef Pilot
07-21-2015, 07:12 PM
BTW, largest "wastage" of home water are toilets, showers/baths, laundry, dishwasher,... basically in that order. Maybe you should put up a sign (like you see in California in some places) that says "if it's yellow, leave it mellow, if it's brown, flush it down". :twised:

And maybe we should stop with the daily (or weekly) water changes (those that do), and make larger changes less often. Would use less water for the same effect/benefit to our tanks.

albert_dao
07-21-2015, 08:36 PM
BTW, largest "wastage" of home water are toilets, showers/baths, laundry, dishwasher,... basically in that order. Maybe you should put up a sign (like you see in California in some places) that says "if it's yellow, leave it mellow, if it's brown, flush it down". :twised:


Unless you eat lots of meat (beef is a particular offender). Then the biggest waste of water and other resources is more or less due to your diet :)

sumpfinfishe
07-25-2015, 04:05 AM
I agree our water supply issues are insufficient for our population growth, but the are many other factors to consider other than humans wasting gallons a day down our sinks and toilets. Weather patterns have played a huge role in this problem and not just from one hot dry summer. Global warming has shrunk our glaciers or even eradicated them from mountains and peaks in this province.
Also we wouldn't have a water shortage problem if we sold a little less water to folks down south. California would be a ghost state if it wasn't for our water. Also the Nestle corporation comes into our province and milks springs and natural wells of hundreds of thousands of gallons of water a year for pennies a gallon and then sell it back to British Columbians for almost 98% profit, not to mention they also close off access to the once public springs so we can no longer obtain the once free water.

Just my two vents for the day:mrgreen:

PS, I don't run RO in my system, instead pre filter carbon and DI which results in no algae, and healthy happy fish and corals.

spit.fire
07-25-2015, 06:49 PM
Also the Nestle corporation comes into our province and milks springs and natural wells of hundreds of thousands of gallons of water a year for pennies a gallon and then sell it back to British Columbians for almost 98% profit, not to mention they also close off access to the once public springs so we can no longer obtain the once free water.




This is false. As much as I'd like to jump on the "f-Nestle" bandwagon, we have been misled. The province does not SELL the water. In other words, Nestle is not BUYING the water. They are, in layman's terms, renting the rights to use the water. This is very specific wording as it implies that the government can, at any time and for any reason, say "hey, you can't use the water anymore; don't matter if you paid for it." This applies for ALL the industries that use water in BC, not just Nestle.

Additionally, all this petitioning and outrage to pressure the government to charge more forces it out of this position and encourages water rights sales as a commodity. Do we really want this?

Besides, if you really wanted to stick it to the man, it's as simple as not buying bottled water (WHICH IS MORE EXPENSIVE THAN GASOLINE FFS!!!!).

Oh, here's a quick source regarding the actual impact of this "awful operation":

http://achemistinlangley.blogspot.ca/2015/07/on-aquifers-drought-and-nestle-water.html?m=1

This one is a bit more political, but may be interesting to some of you:

http://vancouverisawesome.com/2015/07/13/you-might-actually-be-helping-nestle-by-signing-that-water-use-petition/

I could go on at length about this and might if it comes down to it :)


*EDIT: Oops, this is Albert on Tyler's computer, lol...

sumpfinfishe
07-25-2015, 09:03 PM
OK so nestle doesn't buy the water, they rent the property to gain access to the water source. Either way, they pay a minimal fee, less than what the average lower mainland resident pays in taxes a year to access and use hundreds of thousands of gallons of water and in return after filtering, treating, bottling, and marketing for each bottle of water they sell the profit is 98%.

In my first reply I didn't post my vent about nestle to have a debate on nestle and there business practices, it was merely another example of how we are being told we need to restrict our water usage while giant corporations can use as much water as they want whenever they want.

albert_dao
07-25-2015, 09:16 PM
That's a straw man. If nestle Nestle was drawing water from the same treatment plants, they would have the same restrictions imposed upon them. But seriously, we're being asked to leave our lawns and not fill swimming pools. Is this totally unreasonable? Seems like a step in the right direction.

sumpfinfishe
07-25-2015, 09:45 PM
Well at least were not being asked to rip up our lawns and replace them with gravel or rock gardens yet. In California you can get a rebate from the government to do this, which in turn covers the cost of hiring a company to rip up your lawn, certify the action and put down a dry substrate :sad: