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View Full Version : Cheap ricordea or zoas


Nano
11-09-2011, 02:37 AM
Anyone from Either Leduc Wetaskiwin Ponoka Or Edmonton, have small ricordea or zoa frags for my 20 gallon nano? And what are you charging?

BlueWorldAquatic
11-09-2011, 04:55 AM
we always have a supply for starter frags $5 each

Ken - BWA

Nano
11-09-2011, 05:26 AM
we always have a supply for starter frags $5 each

Ken - BWA

Do you sell fish as well? I'm "price shopping" :)
Looking for 1 bangai cardinal
1 pygmie angel of some sort
a few chromis
A green spotted mandarin that will eat live and frozen/flake foods
Yasha Goby
and what ever else I come across

howdy20012002
11-09-2011, 05:36 AM
I try not to preach, but I hope you are not planning to put all that in a 20 gallon.
I don't know of any dwarf angel that would do well in that small of tank.
2 or 3 small fish Max in a 20 gallon IMO (a bit more depending on the fish)
Neal

Nano
11-09-2011, 06:00 AM
well not to argue but I have spoken to about 2 dozen people that would disagree, and fyi, I have a 20 gallon sump running, to accomidate for high bioloads. but no I am not necessarily putting it all in, just looking for certain fish and the prices, to make a choice from there. but thanks.

howdy20012002
11-09-2011, 06:01 AM
I am not sure what 2 dozen people would disagree with what I said.
I don't know many knowledgable people that would say you can put 6 - 8 fish or more fish in a 20 gallon, sump or not. (which is the numbers I assumed you might be looking at from your post)
however, totally your choice and if you aren't intending to put all the fish mentioned in tank, all the better.
but that is the great thing about this board, there are lots of opinions.
I will keep further ones to myself. good luck
and welcome to the board.
Neal

Nano
11-09-2011, 06:02 AM
and for the record the chromis are last on my list of things to buy, if I cant find what i'm looking for.

Nano
11-09-2011, 06:02 AM
good luck.

not sure if your being genuine or sarcastic I vote sarcastic. thanks. nice to be welcome to this forum by people like you

BlueWorldAquatic
11-09-2011, 06:10 AM
well not to argue but I have spoken to about 2 dozen people that would disagree, and fyi, I have a 20 gallon sump running, to accomidate for high bioloads. but no I am not necessarily putting it all in, just looking for certain fish and the prices, to make a choice from there. but thanks.

I doubt that they are on this site though.

in your sump, are you planning macro algaes? are you planning mangroves? are you planning a skimmer? Biopellets?

It's not bioload that Neil is concerned about, it is the living space, and movement of the fish.

The yasha whould be ok, the mandarin would be tough (unless you have one eating frozen or pellets like mine), chromis are schooling fish (therefore requiring lotsa space to swim around), the pygmy ange would be kinda ok (if it is a cherub).

The fish will fight in a comfined space, or at least stress the hell out of each other.

just a few suggestions.

howdy20012002
11-09-2011, 06:12 AM
i wasn't being scarcastic, I was trying to give you advice.
individually, these fish might be fine.(pygmy, chromis questionable)
however, together, IMO, they wouldn't be. (fish like having their own spaces, hard to do in 2 feet of space)
but sounds like you don't need or want my advice, so I will keep it to myself.
thanks
Neal

Nano
11-09-2011, 06:14 AM
I am not sure what 2 dozen people would disagree with what I said.
I don't know many knowledgable people that would say you can put 6 - 8 fish or more fish in a 20 gallon, sump or not. (which is the numbers I assumed you might be looking at from your post)
however, totally your choice and if you aren't intending to put all the fish mentioned in tank, all the better.
but that is the great thing about this board, there are lots of opinions.
I will keep further ones to myself. good luck
and welcome to the board.
Neal

no the opinions come from 3reef and reef aquatics as well as a few lfs in the area. at any rate, my plan is 1clown, 2-3 chromis and a mandarin, and maybe a blenny. thats not a heavy load for almost 40 gallons.

BlueWorldAquatic
11-09-2011, 06:30 AM
Please don't take Neil opinions personally.

We all know what works for us, may not work for others. He's just trying to help.

I still take a lot of advice on these forums, and help out where I can.

Nano
11-09-2011, 06:33 AM
oh no I appreciate where he's coming from, and yes I'm new so i should take the opinions into mind, but as said i have heard from many that 4-6 smaller fish will be ok. thanks though

BlueWorldAquatic
11-09-2011, 06:38 AM
you can have 10+ fish in that tank, just depends on what you get.

small gobies, clown gobies, etc are all fine.

if you have a clownfish, consider an anemone, as it will give him a home, and he won't travel around the tank much.

As I said before, mandarins are tough, most tanks under 20gal can't handle them unless you get a conditioned one. Pods will be depleted very fast, and he may starve.

If you want corals, angels are not a good choice even pygmy, they all can get a taste for corals.

I would not recommend chromis, for their schooling instincts, they require more space.

Honestly, there are only a few LFS that would recommend that many fish in a 20gal tank.

Nano
11-09-2011, 06:42 AM
thank you! genuine advice thats why I am here. I have thought of an anenome, but am afraid of it either stinging other corals or taking over the tank. My concern with the mandarin is starvation, I do have and enormous amount of pods, but understand that its a small tank and they may not be able to reproduce fast enough. I would love a blenny and maybe a yasha, lol I'd like a lot of things just cant have them all ;) but I would like to have a few fish with some nice color

Funky_Fish14
11-09-2011, 07:21 AM
You will likely find that an enormous population of pods will dissapear quickly even with a non-pod-eating fish in the tank. (Just the idea of a 'threat' swimming around will diminish their activity and thus also feeding space, reducing the population).

I agree with the Ken and Neal that it is quite a number of fish intended to go in to the tank. The thing is, you certainly may be able to handle the bioload with a sump and good filtration, but like they said, it doesnt mean the fish will be happy (territorially). Also, the more fish pressure you put on the system, the more likely something is to go wrong (which is often more discouraging to new hobbyists than seasoned keepers), and can also promote more things like algae problems, etc... A tank that ends up with problems is not fun, or ugly with algae... then you dont want to clean it. If its not fun, you wont stick with it. You will find patience to be a virtue in the hobby. :)

About the pygmy angel... it would be inadvisable to put it in such a small tank.

Chromis are cool fish... cheap, somewhat hardy, eat anything, not agressive to other species, school, are active and relatively colourful. The problem you may find (if you look up chromis discussions on this or any board) is that often, schools that are too small(as in under 20) are kept together and it seems they knock each other off until there is 1 left. It seems they are best kept in larger groups. 1 will do fine in your tank, you may wish to try that instead of a small group.

Cheers,

Chris

Nano
11-09-2011, 07:30 AM
thanks for the reply, I am not sure about chromis for that reason. I think I might try a couple of gobies, and something else that is small hahaha. I have some hermits and a peppermint shrimp, but they dont make and impact on the system really, if anything they help by cleaning up waste

Funky_Fish14
11-09-2011, 10:07 AM
An appropriate combination of small gobies and blennies, and other little fish, will probably work just great.
Although their impact is fairly small, hermits, snails, shrimp and the like, still contribute to the bioload. Yes they eat up leftover food and stuff.. snails and hermits eat algae... but they also all poop just like the fish do! Haha. I cant say anything for the quantities... but im sure that a few hermits poop just as much as 1 fish might.

A member on the site here, Bev, did a photo or video record of her tank that only had invertebrates in it, (tanks were live rock, corals, and assorted snails/crabs I think?). Anyways, the tanks were barebottom, and she was still syphoning out a nice pile of detritus on a regular basis.

Anyways, not saying the critters dont help. They certainly do, by making algaes and leftovers easier for smaller inverts, bacteria/microbes etc... to 'process', but keep in mind they still transfer the energy back 'out'. :)

I guess its not a big deal with just a few... but I dont like folks thinking they are entirely inconsequential, haha.

Cheers,

Chris

Nano
11-09-2011, 03:39 PM
much appreciated guys. And Blue I will be coming to check out your store, I have normally gone to marine aquaria which I love for advice and service, and big als, but they dont seem to take awesome care of their fish.
Thanks again guys

BlueWorldAquatic
11-09-2011, 03:45 PM
An appropriate combination of small gobies and blennies, and other little fish, will probably work just great.
Although their impact is fairly small, hermits, snails, shrimp and the like, still contribute to the bioload. Yes they eat up leftover food and stuff.. snails and hermits eat algae... but they also all poop just like the fish do! Haha. I cant say anything for the quantities... but im sure that a few hermits poop just as much as 1 fish might.

A member on the site here, Bev, did a photo or video record of her tank that only had invertebrates in it, (tanks were live rock, corals, and assorted snails/crabs I think?). Anyways, the tanks were barebottom, and she was still syphoning out a nice pile of detritus on a regular basis.

Anyways, not saying the critters dont help. They certainly do, by making algaes and leftovers easier for smaller inverts, bacteria/microbes etc... to 'process', but keep in mind they still transfer the energy back 'out'. :)

I guess its not a big deal with just a few... but I dont like folks thinking they are entirely inconsequential, haha.

Cheers,

Chris

Have you ever saw a Mexican Turbo snail poop? damn, they are like 1/2 mm across, and 2mm long, and they have like 8-10 at a time.

damn, I need a life, when I am talking about the bowel movements of a snail it's a good indication I need a vacation.. :lol:

Seamazter
11-09-2011, 04:00 PM
Have you ever saw a Mexican Turbo snail poop? damn, they are like 1/2 mm across, and 2mm long, and they have like 8-10 at a time.

damn, I need a life, when I am talking about the bowel movements of a snail it's a good indication I need a vacation.. :lol:

Hahahahah.
I think you may be right, i was thinking about watching one to see if you were right.
Im just going to let you have this one, and try to forget about pooping snails.

BlueWorldAquatic
11-09-2011, 04:05 PM
well I can say I was doing research, and I can actually pay myself to do so.

Maybe I have a new assigment for my staff on slow days :twised:

Seamazter
11-09-2011, 04:23 PM
The hard part would be keeping them awake, while they watch.

Nano
11-09-2011, 09:39 PM
lol. geez guys :BIG:

Funky_Fish14
11-10-2011, 07:59 AM
Hahahahah.
I think you may be right, i was thinking about watching one to see if you were right.
Im just going to let you have this one, and try to forget about pooping snails.

Lol this is funny.

Ken I do think you are right though. I've also seen hermit crabs take some gigantic poops.