PDA

View Full Version : sw noob.


luvthereefer
09-03-2011, 07:53 AM
just like the title reads...been into freshwater for awhile now,but im on the verge of buying a 14gal biocube.
I'm thinking of taking the plunge and tryin a little nano tank.

what would be a good stock list for FOWLR for now and then a few soft corals down the road?

if anyone has any personal experience with this setup i would love to hear about it.

thanx

ReefOcean
09-07-2011, 11:16 PM
Belive it or not, nanos are harder to maintain than larger tanks imo. Less room for error. With that being said, good fish are blennies, gobbies, damsels or clowns.

With a 14g, you wont be tempted by those good looking coral eating fish like butterflies and angels because they wont fit.

The biocube will support softies obviously, and some LPS as well. It is a good turn key setup but like I said about maintenance, be prepared to monitor water conditions since the water volume is so low.

Dr_Hicks
11-26-2011, 05:01 AM
Belive it or not, nanos are harder to maintain than larger tanks imo.

Horsefeathers......

I have had tanks from 500 down to that very same 14 the original poster is asking about, there is no difference in the difficulty level if you pay attention to what you are trying to accomplish in a small tank like the biocube 14.

Seems this will be your first crack at saltwater I suggest you invest in some books that will help you better understand the symbiotic relationships and processes that happen in a saltwater environment, some good reading martial can be the best investment you could make into your future endeavour.

Here is a short list of books I keep laying around, you might also find them educational.
Simplified Reef Keeping (http://simplifiedreefkeeping.com/index.php)
Natural Reef Aquariums (http://www.amazon.ca/Natural-Reef-Aquariums-Simplified-Approaches/dp/1890087009)
Aquarium Corals, Selection & Husbandry (http://www.amazon.ca/Aquarium-Corals-Selection-Husbandry-Natural/dp/1890087475/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1322283885&sr=1-2)

If you have some questions about modifications you can make to your little nano; please shoot me a privet message, I would be more than happy to help you with a few shortcuts worth taking.

Nano
11-26-2011, 05:19 AM
both above comments have valid points.

outacontrol
11-26-2011, 05:24 AM
both above comments have valid points. Small tanks have less water volume, therefore water quality goes down hill fast if your not on top of things, but at the same time, you can fix problems in small tanks with less chemical or salt mix, this = less $$. Now I'm stil new to this too in fact I'm just going into month 3, its a lot of work with a mall tank, always watching levels, and topping off your tank because a half a gallon out of my 20 that evaporates, can through the salinity out of whack way more then in a larger tank. I eventually would like to go larger, but honestly felt the need to challenge myself to see if I was up to this. I would recommend (personally) at the very least, 20 gallons for a starter. you'd be amazed what 6 extra gallons could do lol. make sure to listen to these people on here (some of them know what they are talking about!) at least thats what I am slowly learning haha. good luck with the reefing and welcome aboard

I find it really funny with all the problems you keep posting about that you are now offering advice, to other new reefers. Just my 2 cents.

Nano
11-26-2011, 05:29 AM
I find it really funny with all the problems you keep posting about that you are now offering advice, to other new reefers. Just my 2 cents.

Sorry

Aquattro
11-26-2011, 05:59 AM
I find it really funny with all the problems you keep posting about that you are now offering advice, to other new reefers. Just my 2 cents.

He offered valid advice on tank size, not maintaining pH :) I started this hobby trading advice with people no more experienced than I was, that's how I learned a lot of lessons. On a forum like this, any wrong advice is quickly filtered, so really, while you may find it funny, please keep the humor to yourself.

Myka
11-26-2011, 06:02 AM
Personally, I think anything less than about 20 gallons can get a bit tricky. The biggest issue being evaporation...fluctuating salinity means fluctuating parameters. Evaporation affects a lot when you stop to think about it. Stability is key in maintaining reef aquaria. FOWLR (fish only with live rock) tanks aren't as fussy. There are a lot of really easy beginner corals out there since reef keeping has made it leaps and bounds especially in the last 10 years makes it so much easier. Reef keeping isn't as difficult as a lot of people think!

I would suggest trying to find the largest biocube...29 gallons I think? It would be easier for you in the long run. You may be disappointed in the stocking limits going from freshwater to saltwater, and I think you may be shocked at how few fish you can keep in a 14 gallon tank.

First things first, are you wanting a pair of clownfish? This seems to be "everyone's" want, so if a pair of clownfish are a must have, then be aware that would be all you could put in a 14 gallon biocube...maybe a small goby, but that would be pushing it. 14 gallons is too small for ornamental shrimp too which are fun to watch. Stepping up to the 29 really opens up a lot more doors. Keeping an eye out for a 20-40 gallon setup used is also a good idea. People are often selling a whole system with tank, sump, etc. Sumps makes maintenance easier, and generally you will be more successful in keeping a healthy tank (because of better filtering options).

Small tanks have less water volume, therefore water quality goes down hill fast if your not on top of things [...] Now I'm stil new to this too in fact I'm just going into month 3, its a lot of work with a mall tank

Good advice from a newbie to a newbie - complete with proper disclaimer. :p

Nano
11-26-2011, 06:13 AM
Good advice from a newbie to a newbie - complete with proper disclaimer. :p

Thanks Myka, I'm trying! I'm still pretty oblivious to alot of salt waters mysteries, but I do know the over all basics of the aquarist hobby!! :P fresh water 10 years and running, now its time to apply some of my knowledge towards a new hobby, and learn in the process.

- Take it from me, I bought a 20, and got off to a rocky start, ask just about anyone on here lol I've become the "what not to do" guy of the month haha. But now I have made a few pals on here, that have pointed me in the right direction, Myka is one of them (Super smart) 29 is a great size, I'm eventually going to make my 20 into a sump, and move up to a 40g. maybe this summer, even with my gass lid I lose alot to evaporation and am topping off about 1 liter per day so in retrospec I wouldve gone larger haha

jtbadco
11-26-2011, 06:33 AM
+1 nanomano

You don't have to be an expert to share your knowledge with others and you made valid points

Nano
11-26-2011, 06:35 AM
+1 nanomano

You don't have to be an expert to share your knowledge with others and you made valid points

Thanks bud. I'm picking thing up as I go.

Reef Pilot
11-26-2011, 04:00 PM
Thanks bud. I'm picking thing up as I go.
Actually, I am quite impressed at how quickly you have learned, and willing to give back advice is good. I've been into SW just over a year now, and can definitely relate.

With extensive research and learning from mistakes, I think newbies are sometimes more up to date on the latest techniques and products than some of the old timers. And it is good to question some of the advice here on these forums. I know in my case, I have already proven wrong some advice given to me by some of the old timers on this forum.

Reefie
11-29-2011, 09:23 AM
Thanks Myka, I'm trying! I'm still pretty oblivious to alot of salt waters mysteries, but I do know the over all basics of the aquarist hobby!! :P fresh water 10 years and running, now its time to apply some of my knowledge towards a new hobby, and learn in the process.

- Take it from me, I bought a 20, and got off to a rocky start, ask just about anyone on here lol I've become the "what not to do" guy of the month haha. But now I have made a few pals on here, that have pointed me in the right direction, Myka is one of them (Super smart) 29 is a great size, I'm eventually going to make my 20 into a sump, and move up to a 40g. maybe this summer, even with my gass lid I lose alot to evaporation and am topping off about 1 liter per day so in retrospec I wouldve gone larger haha

I might suggest getting an ATO or switching to LEDs if you have that much evap on a 20G, or possibly a shorter photo period on your lights to keep heat down.

Reefie
11-29-2011, 09:30 AM
+1 on the BioCube 29

It's a great all-in-one, I would recommend reefcentral for some good reading on BioCubes. Lots of great info and a few easy minor mods to make your life easier.

I've taken my BC29 way too far for a nano-tank, ATO, Chiller, LEDs, Skimmer, Phosphate Reactor, and pretty much all the mods/upgrades RC has recommended.

:biggrin:

[QUOTE=Myka;654071]Personally, I think anything less than about 20 gallons can get a bit tricky. The biggest issue being evaporation...fluctuating salinity means fluctuating parameters. Evaporation affects a lot when you stop to think about it. Stability is key in maintaining reef aquaria. FOWLR (fish only with live rock) tanks aren't as fussy. There are a lot of really easy beginner corals out there since reef keeping has made it leaps and bounds especially in the last 10 years makes it so much easier. Reef keeping isn't as difficult as a lot of people think!

I would suggest trying to find the largest biocube...29 gallons I think? It would be easier for you in the long run. You may be disappointed in the stocking limits going from freshwater to saltwater, and I think you may be shocked at how few fish you can keep in a 14 gallon tank.

First things first, are you wanting a pair of clownfish? This seems to be "everyone's" want, so if a pair of clownfish are a must have, then be aware that would be all you could put in a 14 gallon biocube...maybe a small goby, but that would be pushing it. 14 gallons is too small for ornamental shrimp too which are fun to watch. Stepping up to the 29 really opens up a lot more doors. Keeping an eye out for a 20-40 gallon setup used is also a good idea. People are often selling a whole system with tank, sump, etc. Sumps makes maintenance easier, and generally you will be more successful in keeping a healthy tank (because of better filtering options).

jakejake
11-29-2011, 05:33 PM
JBJ Led Powered Nano Cube
89 watts
32 lbs of live rock 2 months old

i started out with a 14 bio cube to get my feet wet.good starter for myself.

1 yellow goby
1 pistol shrimp
2 clowns
2 damsels
1 blennie
lots of critters
2 cleanner shrimp
1 elegance, 1 hammerhead, 1 feather duster
happy tank and easy to maintain.
i would love to go even bigger but limited to space in home.

evaneatspie555
11-29-2011, 06:27 PM
A nano may be difficult but once u upgrade to a larger tank it will be easier to maintain with water peramiters

paddyob
11-29-2011, 06:34 PM
Belive it or not, nanos are harder to maintain than larger tanks imo. Less room for error. With that being said, good fish are blennies, gobbies, damsels or clowns.

With a 14g, you wont be tempted by those good looking coral eating fish like butterflies and angels because they wont fit.

The biocube will support softies obviously, and some LPS as well. It is a good turn key setup but like I said about maintenance, be prepared to monitor water conditions since the water volume is so low.


+1

Horsefeathers......

I have had tanks from 500 down to that very same 14 the original poster is asking about, there is no difference in the difficulty level if you pay attention to what you are trying to accomplish in a small tank like the biocube 14.

Seems this will be your first crack at saltwater I suggest you invest in some books that will help you better understand the symbiotic relationships and processes that happen in a saltwater environment, some good reading martial can be the best investment you could make into your future endeavour.

Here is a short list of books I keep laying around, you might also find them educational.
Simplified Reef Keeping (http://simplifiedreefkeeping.com/index.php)
Natural Reef Aquariums (http://www.amazon.ca/Natural-Reef-Aquariums-Simplified-Approaches/dp/1890087009)
Aquarium Corals, Selection & Husbandry (http://www.amazon.ca/Aquarium-Corals-Selection-Husbandry-Natural/dp/1890087475/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1322283885&sr=1-2)

If you have some questions about modifications you can make to your little nano; please shoot me a privet message, I would be more than happy to help you with a few shortcuts worth taking.



Nano are Definately more challenging.

More heat issues. More evap. Less room for error.

Some experts may not be phased bunt for one am glad I graduated from nanos to large sump systems.

You can't deny a nano requires more maintenance. I can let my 70 go 3-4 days without a top up.

My 20 is daily.

Dr_Hicks
11-29-2011, 07:22 PM
Nano are Definately more challenging.

More heat issues. More evap. Less room for error.

Some experts may not be phased bunt for one am glad I graduated from nanos to large sump systems.

You can't deny a nano requires more maintenance. I can let my 70 go 3-4 days without a top up.

My 20 is daily.

Difficulty is a perception based thought process; and perception is a very personal process, as you become accustomed to what you need to do maintenance wise; perception changes, that is why I gave the advice to pay attention to what s/he was trying to accomplish in a small space like a 14g aquarium :wink:

I enjoy anything to do with maintaining aquariums, my thought process dose not factor difficulty into the equation, it's just an enjoyable task that I get to do.

What I am getting at is; not everyones perception weighs difficulty as a downer, it's a personal thing :surprise: