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_Adrian_
11-24-2014, 07:05 AM
Hey guys...
I think it's time I start shedding some light on my upcoming build.

Arduino Reef Monitor ( ARM )
Based on an Arduino Due and the East Rising ER-TFT070-5 (http://www.buydisplay.com/download/manual/ER-TFTM070-5_Datasheet.pdf) ( Data Sheet in link ) this will act as the main controller and display.

Sensor Module:
There is no point of trying to hack and and design something that already exists. I'm probably going to use Open Reefs Senseable (http://www.openreefs.com/products/senseable) for this purpose.

Light Module:
This unit will be an Arduino Due shield.
There is little to nothing on the market that is aimed at the DIY hobbyist for salt water use.
Here's a few key points:
- 24V to 48VDC Fused Input
- On Boards regulators for the 3.3V and 5V required by the Due ( No external power source required!)
- 12Ch LED Drivers ( LDD-1000HS (http://www.meanwell.com/webapp/product/search.aspx?prod=ldd-h) )
- RTC ( DS1307 (http://www.maximintegrated.com/en/products/digital/real-time-clocks/DS1307.html) )
- On board Input Voltage and Current Monitors ( Linear LTC2946 ) (http://cds.linear.com/docs/en/datasheet/2946f.pdf)

All Electronics will be housed in waterproof enclosure with waterproof connectors.

ScubaSteve
11-24-2014, 08:38 AM
Hooooo-boy! That's a heck of a build! That'll be a fun one but a bit if a slog! I just finished something similar (not for my tanks, but for some equipment at work, but similar architecture) and it took 200 hours to build the electronics, the equipment and program it! The worst part was that I had only 2 weeks to do it...

If you have a need for custom PCBs, I can point you in the direction of a few good places I have used... But then again, if you know how to design a board you probably know where to have them made!

Have fun!

_Adrian_
11-24-2014, 09:32 AM
I have a few choices lol
If I stick to dual layer I can do them here at home ; -)

theokie
11-24-2014, 03:14 PM
That open Reef Stuff looks really interesting. I was going to do a Jarduino build a year or two back but with my work schedule an Apex was just more feasible. I bought all the parts for it, just never got around to assembly.

Definitely following along

_Adrian_
11-24-2014, 10:09 PM
I have the Arduino Due and the LCD... can get most of the stuff here in town that i need for the better part. The parts for the light fixture will be coming off eBay.
I also have a hot air rework station and the skill to go along with it to so everything SMT if need be. The electronic side its going to be a piece of cake!

The programing might be another story !
I haven't done anything in a VERY LONG time LOL

I hope I can get a copy of his code and change a few things...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-XwAnYvdk4

_Adrian_
11-26-2014, 01:19 AM
Well...
Today was a slow day at work, which led me think a bit.
How can I make things simple and avoid a ton of redundant parts without tying up the PWM outputs of the Due
Long story short...
Here's the answer !!!
TI's LM3463 (http://www.ti.com/product/LM3463/description) !!
Some of the Key Features that are of interest to us:
- Wide supply voltage range 12V - 95V
- 6 driven channels ( using MOSFET's
- Capable of Analog, PWM dimming OR Serial Control

Right now the only thing I'm debating is the output stage.
In order to keep the board size down I would have to go to a TO220 through hole transistor over the DPAK surface mount units. This way a heat sink can be used rather than using precious board space as a heat sink.

With that being said...
Light Control Module ( LCM ) specs I have in mind are as follows:
- 12V - 48VDC Input
- 6 Channels
- High Current Capable
- Full Control ( Analog, PWM or Serial )

_Adrian_
11-26-2014, 01:42 AM
The idea behind this is to reduce the large amount of DC/DC converters ( LDD1000h ) and replace it with a cheaper device ( MOSFET ) that outperforms it.
A better way of going about this is the Vishay SUP50N10 (http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/427/sup50n1021p-348598.pdf). This MOSFET is capable of 50A continuous ( 60A peak ) drain current and 100V are around $1.25 VS the $10 for each LDD1000h which has a puny 1A output.
By moving away from dedicated, expensive DC/DC Current and robbing useful PWM outputs from the micro controller. Now you can drive large chains of either serial or parallel LED's without breaking your wallet!
As stated earlier, on board Input Voltage and Current Monitor will be retained. With a bit of code and this can be used to track power consumption.
This might just be the ultimate solution for those that want a flexible DIY High Power LED Driver / Controller that would allows to start off with a basic setup and move up as budget allows!

StirCrazy
11-27-2014, 03:41 AM
TI's LM3463 (http://www.ti.com/product/LM3463/description) !!
Some of the Key Features that are of interest to us:
- Wide supply voltage range 12V - 95V
- 6 driven channels ( using MOSFET's
- Capable of Analog, PWM dimming OR Serial Control



I like the possibilities this opens, from the description

"The analog dimming control input controls the current of all LEDs while the PWM control inputs control the dimming duty of output channels individually."

with this one you could use the PWM to balance your colors and then use the analog to do your sunrise sunset

Steve

_Adrian_
11-27-2014, 04:03 AM
I like the possibilities this opens, from the description

"The analog dimming control input controls the current of all LEDs while the PWM control inputs control the dimming duty of output channels individually."

with this one you could use the PWM to balance your colors and then use the analog to do your sunrise sunset

Steve

The problem with that is that you can only choose 1 of those options.
If you have a Reef Angel or similar controller you can use PWM, but if your just starting out and have nothing you cans use some simple pots to control the channels. For those that want something more different, the Arduino route can be used with I2S and a program can be written for control.

Also I noticed something weird this morning...
There's only 4 hard wired dim controls. Seems like Channels 1 and 2 share the same dimmer as well as 3 and 4 share another. channels 5 and 6 are individually controlled.

I sent TI an email to clarify this for me as if this is only a PWM or Analog control only or does it apply to serial control as well.
Keeping fingers crossed either way as sometimes its just a matter of not having enough pins on the device.

_Adrian_
03-24-2015, 07:09 AM
Well...
Its time for an update!!!

Had a hella time with remembering on how to use Altium LOL

Schematic for the LME3463 and drivers are almost laid out.
Have to call the TI tech line to have a quick chat with an engineer to settle my mind as I been at this for about 6 hrs now with no break and I'm about burnt out!

Aiming for 3-5A MAX per channel... so ramping, current limiting and start-up current control are critical to keep heat dissipation to a minimum as well as keeping a constant voltage and constant current to the LED's.

I'm about 80% done now and if everything checks out with the TI boys i will start laying out the prototype boards VERY SOON !!

The boards will be set up in a "UNIVERSAL" mode with jumpers to select between Analog, PWM or Serial control and I'm hopeing to keep them around 2" x 4" and 3" x 5"

Most of the PCB will be SMD ( surface mount) beside the FET's which will be T0220 devices. This way a smaller PCB can be used, but FET's will require a heatsink depending on the draw and dissipation.

_Adrian_
04-12-2015, 07:46 AM
Well...
About 6 hrs of fiddling around ( from devices created in the library, schematic being drawn up to PCB board laid out ) this would be the final result :)

Top Layer:
http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/TL%20LED%20Driver_zpsemoh34hi.jpg

Bottom Layer:
http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/BL%20LED%20Driver_zpsz9jpqkv8.jpg

Size is 58mm x 36mm ( 2.25" x 1.4" )
SW1 - Mode Select ( External / Disable )
D2 - Fault Indicator - signal is also available externally
This board is capable of 6CH TOTAL ( CH0/CH1 and 2CH/CH3 share dimming controls )

Other than that these board will go on a Larger Main board that will hold the power rails and MOSFET's as well as it can house 4 of these modules in Master / Slave configuration.
This configuration will give 8CH of control with 12CH of Output. Slave units will be receive data from master via serial and offer an additional 12CH of output.
Please bare in mind that each channel is capable of 5A of current as well as operating up to 96VDC. Boards have been sent out and hoping to see the first batch in soon as well as more testing !!!

Scythanith
04-12-2015, 05:46 PM
All I can say is good on ya! That may as well be a martian language! Good luck with the soldering.

_Adrian_
04-12-2015, 05:56 PM
All I can say is good on ya! That may as well be a martian language! Good luck with the soldering.

Only 1 item needs to be hand soldered...
Everything else will be done via a stencil and a re-flow oven :wink:

Then again, some items can be omitted and/or left off in case you want to externally adjust things through the external components which will be mainly be through hole components :)

Scythanith
04-12-2015, 07:45 PM
Oh well of course! I completely forgot about stenciling and the re-flow oven.... ;)

_Adrian_
04-12-2015, 08:47 PM
Oh well of course! I completely forgot about stenciling and the re-flow oven.... ;)

The PCB house that I'm using will include an SS stencil if I order 100 boards which from the looks of it will be about $80

_Adrian_
05-11-2015, 03:26 AM
Things have evolved into something a bit more than just a "simple" board !!
Driver Modules them-self were redesigned to facilitate simpler routing on the main board.

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/LM3463%20TOPV2_zpsl2m1cq68.jpg

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/LM3463%20BOTOMV2_zpshdpjenll.jpg

The main board does not share a central power source either as each module ( up to 4 can be plugged

into the main board ) have their separate power supplies, which comes in handy when your running LED

strings with different voltages ( 2.4V - 2.7V VS 3.2V - 3.6 ) now doesn't have to be a logistical

nightmare.

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/Mainboard%20V2%20-%20TOP_zps0qsmwjet.jpg

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/Mainboard%20V2%20-%20BOTTOM_zpsmromn0qo.jpg

Another change is the MOSFET implementation. By adding dedicated connectors for each MOSFET and Reference Resistor now channels can be "Enabled" or "Disabled" by powering down the unit and unplugging the MOSFET module. This was when the unit is powered back up it will check the MOSFET and Reference Resistor and if not found the chip will disable said channel.

All the controls are available on the center of the board via a IDC header that can used as is, or use a number of Control boards that I have designed to be plug and play and offer a number of configurations on the fly.
The I2C board allows one to use a single serial cable to control all 16 dimmers via an NXP

PCA9685 (www.adafruit.com/datasheets/PCA9685.pdf). This chip can be "addressed" so multiple units can run simultaneously on the same bus allowing LARGE light arrays to be controlled via a single controller. Currently ther is no on-board power for the chip and will be supplied externally via the I2C header either from the micro controller. I have been thinging of adding in a DC/DC buck converter, but at this time its just a speculation, but it may become reality as this project is evolving.

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/I2C%20PWM%20Board-Top_zpspwe0ojfi.jpg

http://i161.photobucket.com/albums/t221/adrculda/LED%20Light/I2C%20PWM%20Board-Bottom_zpsxnccupyt.jpg

In the works is an pure PWM board as well as a serial board board. Even though the IDC is available some "configuration" is required via the mode pin.

Currently I'm working on a I2C shield for your standard arduino using 40x4 Character LCD and and a rotary encoder.
Latter on complete controller package will be offered.
This way a simple out of the box solution is available allowing each channel to be controlled independently as well as a single master control.