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EdsonFOWLR
05-10-2014, 12:31 AM
Well my tank is finally cycled out and I am going to add some fish (2 clowns and a sandsifting goby) as well as a cleanup crew (2 peppermint shrimp and some hermits and snails). Whats the best way to acclimate my new additions? I had heard of the drip system but wasent sure what was all involved and if I could acclimate everyone in the same container?

chi
05-10-2014, 12:47 AM
Use the drift method. The only time it fails is when you're receiving the livestock when it's been bagged for a prolonged period of time

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EdsonFOWLR
05-10-2014, 12:52 AM
should I float the bags first to acclimate them to the temp of the tank first or after they have been driped?

chi
05-10-2014, 01:13 AM
Do it after they've been dripped. You should quarantine those fish, as you're at the best time to do so.

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Madreefer
05-10-2014, 04:02 AM
Good info in this thread.

http://www.canreef.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=100952

EdsonFOWLR
05-10-2014, 04:40 AM
Good info in this thread.

http://www.canreef.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=100952

Good thread Madreefer, answered a lot of the questions I had and made me feel more at ease putting livestock in my tank for the first time.

EdsonFOWLR
05-11-2014, 03:42 PM
Thanx everyone who posted, added my new additions to my tank and everyone is doing great. It was a lot easyer than I thought.

mike31154
05-12-2014, 04:45 PM
I usually check & compare a couple of paramaters before setting new livestock loose in my tank. If salinity & pH are fairly close, I don't take very long with any acclimation process. Last fish I added were a Yellow Tang & Sleeper Goby a couple of weeks ago. I put them both in a 1 gallon plastic ice cream container with some of the water from the bags they came in. Salinity in the LFS water was a bit lower than my tank water & pH was higher. pH is one of the parameters that swings in most people's systems, but it generally does so slowly. It's also a parameter that represents a large change between numbers, that is, a 1 point change in pH could have more effect on livestock than a 1 point change in salinity, particularly if that change is very rapid. Depends on the critter too, I guess. Some are more sensitive than others.

Anyhow, after checking those two numbers I added some tank water manually with a cup to the 1 gallon container. A while later I scooped some out of the container & added more tank water. Several cycles of that & I released the hounds. The Tang was fine other than being a little freaked with the new surroundings & some harassment from Singapore Angelfish. No biggy there. The Sleeper Goby seemed quite distressed though & rather than head for the sand, he was swimming near the surface & gasping rapidly. I ended up shepherding him down to the sand bed with my hand since he wasn't settling down & I was afraid he may jump out. He made a few more panicky trips to the surface the first day or two, but has now settled in fairly well. I've tried pretty much every acclimation method including drip. Not sure if there's a best way to do it, as per my most recent experience, different livestock appears to have different sensitivity to change in environment. The only one I recall having lost a few days after adding was a Tuxedo Urchin, but it had spent a long trip in a bag from Vancouver to here, so who knows whether it was the trip, poor acclimation or simply a weak specimen to start with?

EdsonFOWLR
05-12-2014, 08:30 PM
I usually check & compare a couple of paramaters before setting new livestock loose in my tank. If salinity & pH are fairly close, I don't take very long with any acclimation process. Last fish I added were a Yellow Tang & Sleeper Goby a couple of weeks ago. I put them both in a 1 gallon plastic ice cream container with some of the water from the bags they came in. Salinity in the LFS water was a bit lower than my tank water & pH was higher. pH is one of the parameters that swings in most people's systems, but it generally does so slowly. It's also a parameter that represents a large change between numbers, that is, a 1 point change in pH could have more effect on livestock than a 1 point change in salinity, particularly if that change is very rapid. Depends on the critter too, I guess. Some are more sensitive than others.

Anyhow, after checking those two numbers I added some tank water manually with a cup to the 1 gallon container. A while later I scooped some out of the container & added more tank water. Several cycles of that & I released the hounds. The Tang was fine other than being a little freaked with the new surroundings & some harassment from Singapore Angelfish. No biggy there. The Sleeper Goby seemed quite distressed though & rather than head for the sand, he was swimming near the surface & gasping rapidly. I ended up shepherding him down to the sand bed with my hand since he wasn't settling down & I was afraid he may jump out. He made a few more panicky trips to the surface the first day or two, but has now settled in fairly well. I've tried pretty much every acclimation method including drip. Not sure if there's a best way to do it, as per my most recent experience, different livestock appears to have different sensitivity to change in environment. The only one I recall having lost a few days after adding was a Tuxedo Urchin, but it had spent a long trip in a bag from Vancouver to here, so who knows whether it was the trip, poor acclimation or simply a weak specimen to start with?

Well got my first batch of inhabitants, and acclimated in the bag floating in the tank, just added a little tank water at a time. The 2 clownfish did good as well as the sleeper goby who started to sift sand as soon as he was released. The cleanup crew also did good. I only lost one of the two peppermint shrimps and from what I think was left of him on the bottom. There wasent much left. Overall everyone acclimated really well.