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Babalouie
03-12-2014, 08:21 PM
Newish to saltwater, at least it's been a long while since I've kept salt tanks. I'm totally new to corals. My goal is to have a Florida Ricordea tank. Some distant day, I'd like to combine it with h. Erectus and sexy shrimp, but for now, just the ricordea.
I'm looking at a 93 gallon cube or a 150gallon extra high for starters. The tank will have to go in the basement, and we will be remodeling in a couple of years. That will likely mean I will have to temporarily move the tank for construction
So:
1) should I wait a couple years until the basement is redone? I don't mind the work of moving the tank and inhabitants if it can be done safely for the inhabitants.
2) as an alternative to waiting, I can get the ball rolling with a small ricordea tank that can be housed elsewhere. It will give me experience and avoid the need for a tank move. Maybe a tank in the 40 gallon range.

3) any advantage in the 93 cube 30x30x27 vs the 150 gallon 48x24x30 for my purposes (beside added volume)?

Thanks

eli@fijireefrock.com
03-12-2014, 08:29 PM
For me I would start with a tank try things and sure will do great.
But if you are planning for upgrades I would maybe wait or start looking for your ultimate tank build...
If you are looking to try things for a free tank I have a couple 180guns..90glns..and I think 45glns all with metal stands and drilled...hope that makes your plan a little easier...lol
For a new tank build I highly sugest Concept aquarium in Calgary top service...

eli@fijireefrock.com
03-12-2014, 08:31 PM
By the way welcome to Canreef.

SeaHorse_Fanatic
03-12-2014, 08:32 PM
With what you want to keep long-term, I don't see any real advantage going with bigger tank. I have a 93g cube & LOVE it. Looks so much nicer IMO than a standard rectangular tank and yet takes up very little room. I use one pendant to light the whole thing (LEDs) whereas I would need twice as much lighting to do a 150g. Also, not a huge fan of 30" deep tanks, although seahorses supposedly like the extra depth for mating dances. When I used to keep seahorses (mostly Erectus & Kudas w/c) back in the day, I had them doing the dance in 33g tanks (18" tall) so the 24" height of the 93g cube should still be sufficient.

Also, the seahorses will LOVE your sexy shrimp (expensive snacks). My friend's Reidis used to eat 300-400 fw ghost shrimp a month and those are 10 times bigger than sexy shrimp. Serious incompatibility issue. Sexy shrimp are tiny and to really enjoy them best, set up a nano where their small size works to your advantage and is not a disadvantage. You could set up a ricordea/sexy shrimp tank to start and later build the bigger system and move some of the rics over. It will give you time to grow them out cause a tank full of rics is super expensive unless you live in the States and can get them wholesale or direct from the source.

Anthony

Babalouie
03-13-2014, 02:30 PM
With what you want to keep long-term, I don't see any real advantage going with bigger tank. I have a 93g cube & LOVE it. Looks so much nicer IMO than a standard rectangular tank and yet takes up very little room. I use one pendant to light the whole thing (LEDs) whereas I would need twice as much lighting to do a 150g. Also, not a huge fan of 30" deep tanks, although seahorses supposedly like the extra depth for mating dances. When I used to keep seahorses (mostly Erectus & Kudas w/c) back in the day, I had them doing the dance in 33g tanks (18" tall) so the 24" height of the 93g cube should still be sufficient.

Also, the seahorses will LOVE your sexy shrimp (expensive snacks). My friend's Reidis used to eat 300-400 fw ghost shrimp a month and those are 10 times bigger than sexy shrimp. Serious incompatibility issue. Sexy shrimp are tiny and to really enjoy them best, set up a nano where their small size works to your advantage and is not a disadvantage. You could set up a ricordea/sexy shrimp tank to start and later build the bigger system and move some of the rics over. It will give you time to grow them out cause a tank full of rics is super expensive unless you live in the States and can get them wholesale or direct from the source.

Anthony
Thanks for the reply. I find the cube a bit more appealing as well. Glad to hear it will be suitable for the ricordea and the seahorses. Also, thanks for the heads up on the sexy shrimp. A smaller tank for them sounds like a good idea. I just have the notion in my head that smaller tanks in sw is a bad thing for stability issue, but I know that isn't always true. I just need to move past that.

Did you have your cube drilled or did you use another setup?

Babalouie
03-13-2014, 02:37 PM
For me I would start with a tank try things and sure will do great.
But if you are planning for upgrades I would maybe wait or start looking for your ultimate tank build...
If you are looking to try things for a free tank I have a couple 180guns..90glns..and I think 45glns all with metal stands and drilled...hope that makes your plan a little easier...lol
For a new tank build I highly sugest Concept aquarium in Calgary top service...

Thanks Eli,
I'm sure I'll add a tank at some point. I'm not concerned with an upgrade as much as I am having to move everything when we redo the basement. But it sounds like it won't be detrimental to the tank inhabitants if I move them temporarily to another tank while the Reno is happening in a couple years.

Thanks for the generous offer on the tanks. I honestly have no idea how to get a 180 gallon into my basement. Is there a moving service that specializes I. Aquariums?

I've actually tried Concept before but I haven't received a return call.

SeaHorse_Fanatic
03-13-2014, 05:18 PM
I changed out both of my smaller tanks (RSM 34g & non-reefready 2' cube) for Reef Ready cubes (30" & 2'). Love them.

BackPackHunter
03-14-2014, 05:38 AM
Call concept again ask for Denny
Tell him what your looking for, and the plan for the tank he'll help you
I ordered 2 tanks today from him, didn't take 15min

This will be my 3rd tank from him and 1 sump couldn't be happier
Great customer service

Babalouie
03-16-2014, 01:06 AM
Call concept again ask for Denny
Tell him what your looking for, and the plan for the tank he'll help you
I ordered 2 tanks today from him, didn't take 15min

This will be my 3rd tank from him and 1 sump couldn't be happier
Great customer service

Well, I did try again and the only thing I can conclude is that I was calling the wrong number originally. I did get Denny and he has been extremely helpful with getting me started. Thanks for suggesting I try again.

mattr
03-16-2014, 07:19 AM
run. run for your life

Snappy
03-16-2014, 08:06 AM
Welcome to CanReef! I would get started on a tank right away and when it's time to upgrade then do the upgrade. Get your "feet wet" ASAP and gain invaluable experience that will help you become successful moving forward.

Babalouie
03-17-2014, 02:57 AM
Well, the price tags have been kind of shocking so far. I thought $2000 was an adequate budget to get a ricordea tank cycling, but it doesn't seem to be the case.
Without opening a can of worms, I didn't think I would need a sump for a ricordea tank. The setups that I have been quoted all seem to be pretty elaborate. The quotes I've been getting for tanks in the 55-90 gallon range from $2200-$7000.
So, is there a simpler way to do this? Should I just pinch my pennies? It's just ricordea with some sexy shrimp. It was my impression they did quite well in nano tanks and the requirements were quite modest.

Madreefer
03-17-2014, 04:18 AM
Those wouldn't be quotes from Concept would they? Cuz my 233G with 100G sump was around $2300. Delivered. Don't seem right to me.

Babalouie
03-17-2014, 05:08 AM
Those wouldn't be quotes from Concept would they? Cuz my 233G with 100G sump was around $2300. Delivered. Don't seem right to me.

The $7k quote was from concept for a full plug and play package. Just the stand, tank, and sump was $1400 without delivery. The additional fee was everything else.
The lower quote was from big als for a 55 gallon. A 65 gallon would be a $100 more. But still, I thought a ricordea tank that small would be fine with a skimmer, power heads, live rock, and a quality light. I thought $2000 was a reasonable figure to be cycling a 55 gallon- no livestock, just cycling.

Or the 93g cube cycling with live sand and dead rock for 2300. Live and learn I guess

BackPackHunter
03-19-2014, 12:46 AM
My 90 gallon QT tank with lids was $200
My sump I designed for it was $250
I'm a ex-welder so I'll weld out my own stand, but you can pm The Grizz on here he probably build you one.
Add $200 for plumbing
$250- for a DC pump
$500-1000 for lights
$100 for a couple heaters
500 for a skimmer
200 if you want to run bio pellets

Live rock is $$$ up to 10 a pound
If you buy it used you will save a lot
Look in the buy n sell

Just start looking on the buy n sell and keep picking up stuff
Before u know it you will have everything

Pick up the tank n sump n stand, then slowly gather up the rest

Sumps are good to have on a salt water tank

Good luck

Babalouie
03-19-2014, 09:13 PM
Here is my idea. I have a 90 gallon guppy tank with an overflow leading to a 20 gallon aquarium sump. The water from the sump is pumped up and crack into the tank through a spray bar. It's nothing fancy , sump wise , and the tank is more if a utility tank.
But, I could move the guppies to a new tank and repurpose the 90 gallon for cycling a salt system, adding live/dead rock as I go and use it to get my feet wet and learn. Then when I'm ready, I can go with a more long term setup and already have all the rock and most of the equiptment and such ready to go.
Only thing I'm not sure of is a spray bar return, but I dont see a reason it should be an issue.

eli@fijireefrock.com
03-19-2014, 09:22 PM
Here is my idea. I have a 90 gallon guppy tank with an overflow leading to a 20 gallon aquarium sump. The water from the sump is pumped up and crack into the tank through a spray bar. It's nothing fancy , sump wise , and the tank is more if a utility tank.
But, I could move the guppies to a new tank and repurpose the 90 gallon for cycling a salt system, adding live/dead rock as I go and use it to get my feet wet and learn. Then when I'm ready, I can go with a more long term setup and already have all the rock and most of the equiptment and such ready to go.
Only thing I'm not sure of is a spray bar return, but I dont see a reason it should be an issue.

Spray bar style return should be fine as long as it's under water as you don't want water splashing over your tank.
even a full bore return works fine.
best if you have a single or couple power heads for more tank water circulating.wether you go dry or live rock it's best to give it the proper curing process.
And slowly add what you like.
Make sure your guppies get a good home:biggrin:

Myka
03-19-2014, 11:39 PM
Well, the price tags have been kind of shocking so far. I thought $2000 was an adequate budget to get a ricordea tank cycling, but it doesn't seem to be the case. [...] So, is there a simpler way to do this? Should I just pinch my pennies? It's just ricordea with some sexy shrimp. It was my impression they did quite well in nano tanks and the requirements were quite modest.

You can certainly have a suitable setup for $2000 all inclusive, but it is not likely to be A 93-gallon custom cube. :)

Are you the DIY type? You can buy a standard aquarium and drill it yourself. Practice drilling a couple $9.99 10-gallon aquariums first. If you can drill one of those cheapo paper-thin-glass tanks without breaking it then you can EASILY drill a bigger tank without breaking it. I've drilled around 40 holes in aquariums and I've only ever broke one 5-gallon with paper-thin glass and one 20-gallon that I was testing to see how fast I could drill it. :o Some aquariums (Hagen comes to mind) sometimes have tempered glass (usually just the bottom of the tank) and you cannot drill tempered as it will shatter. Email the manufacturer before buying. :)

After you drill the tank you can silicone a glass overflow box into the corner, then put acrylic over the glass so you can't see into it. Add some plumbing pieces and you're golden.

Ricordea are certainly simple to keep, but I would strongly suggest a sump if you want seahorses. Seahorses eat a lot of food and are VERY messy eaters (they waste a lot). If you have a sump then you open a lot of better and cheaper opportunities for filtration and skimmers.

Another option is to buy a used setup on Kijiji or even the buy & sell forums here. If you go with a standard size (not a cube) then you will have more options and the price will be lower.

Myka
03-19-2014, 11:52 PM
90-gallon complete in Calgary $589.
http://www.canreef.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=105725

50-gallon tank, stand, sump in Calgary $180
http://www.canreef.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=105711

90-gallon tank, stand, sump in Olds. $300
http://www.canreef.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=105528

milou
03-20-2014, 01:35 AM
$2000 can go a long way if you spend carefully and spend time looking in the classified sections. To start I'd find a used small tank. For ricordea setup it can be as little as a biocube. But I hate those biocube because it doesn't give you option to upgragde down the road. When I start this hobby I found a used 50 gal tank 4ft length and that was plenty to play with. I seldom buy things new, my liverocks and most of my gears are used and you can score a bargain if you have the patience. With the extra money you save you can splurge on nice corals. What keeps me going is looking at nice stuff growing. I've seen people only have $$ to buy cheap frags but you have to understand that some corals grow really slow especially the nice ones and your tanks will look very empty. For me I'd buy nice corals, grow them, frag them if you can and you'd recover your investment already. I can't stand watching empty or crappy corals in my tank.

dino
03-20-2014, 10:45 AM
I agree with everything said and your budget is doable but just like anything if you want it now and new its expensive. If possible take your time watch the forums and take it slow ive learned in this hobby patience us a virtue. Also whats your plan for equipment because you can go fairly basic if you are into a little more maintenance. Also listen to Anthony he knows best

Babalouie
03-20-2014, 10:17 PM
Thanks for the advice, everyone. I think I'll get a 93 g cube kit for the guppies and just convert my 90 gallon overflow with make**** sump. It's not ideal as I will be pumping the return back into the tank with a spray bar. But it will be a brilliant way for me to get started, learn, and things started. When I'm ready and learn enough to know what setup is ideal for me, I'll already have equiptment and stock/rock on hand.

Just need a skimmer and quality light For the 90 g now.
Thanks again