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Reef Pilot
03-03-2014, 11:45 PM
I would like to silicone a hook to the inside of the glass in my tank. That means I have to drain it below that level until the silicone cures. How long before I can raise the water again? I was hoping no longer than a couple hours.

I know they say it takes 24 hrs to cure fully. But I just want it to cure enough so that it won't poison my corals or fish. My tank will have to be disconnected from my sump during that time, and don't really want to leave it that way for too long. I do have internal pumps, so will some internal flow, and a heater.

I tried other means to attach the hook, incl crazy glue and even reef glue (probably the same stuff). It stuck fine to the hook, but not to the glass.

intarsiabox
03-04-2014, 12:19 AM
I'm not sure on silicone cure time but if it helps you can buy plastic hooks with suction cups for hanging things in the shower as a possible option.

Reef Pilot
03-04-2014, 12:25 AM
Thanks for the suggestion. But these are small plastic hooks that I use to hang a frag rack at the back of my tank. I already use them in my other acrylic tank, where krazy glue and frag glue worked. But unfortunately, they don't stick to the glass. So I want to resort to silicone, which does work on glass,... but I don't want to poison my tank.

FishyFishy!
03-04-2014, 12:40 AM
I would personally wait 48 hours to be safe. It shouldn't hurt anything in the tank as long as theres flow, heat and light. Like we all know in this hobby... patience is key to success.

SeaHorse_Fanatic
03-04-2014, 04:30 AM
Yes, wait minimum of 24, preferably more. If it still smells, then its not cured IMO.

Reef Pilot
03-04-2014, 04:41 AM
OK, thanks, guys. I will hold off doing this for now. Does anyone know of anything else besides silicone that will stick to glass and will not harm fish or corals?

FishinGoalie
03-04-2014, 06:51 AM
A magnet somehow? Glue hook to small magnet then you could move it around?

spit.fire
03-04-2014, 07:34 AM
Just pick up a small tube of orca glue and use that

Reef Pilot
03-04-2014, 02:42 PM
Just pick up a small tube of orca glue and use that
Does it stick well to glass? And where do I get that? I did drop into J&L, and all they had was the $35 tube. Kind of defeats my purpose (a cheap frag rack).

FishyFishy!
03-04-2014, 03:09 PM
If you have crazy glue already, go get a used magfloat and make that into a frag rack. Lots of people do that, its cheap and it can be moved easily.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwVIzwz92ls

Reef Pilot
03-04-2014, 03:33 PM
If you have crazy glue already, go get a used magfloat and make that into a frag rack. Lots of people do that, its cheap and it can be moved easily.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwVIzwz92ls
Well, again, the cost of a magfloat (don't have one that I am not using) kind of defeats my aim of a cheap frag rack. I have already used these cheap (a few cents each) plastic clip hooks in my upstairs tank, and they work great to support a frag rack. But that tank is acrylic, and was able to use glue to stick them. Unfortunately, crazy glue, weldon, etc, (or at least those that I have tried) will not stick to glass in my downstairs tank.

I have done a frag rack for my QT tank with small magnets (used plastic paint) and it works well for that tank, as it doesn't have a euro top rim. But in my display tanks, I like to have the frag racks on the back glass, where it is against the wall, so no access to magnets there anyway.

Anyway, thanks for all the suggestions,... keep them coming.

sphelps
03-04-2014, 04:52 PM
3 hours is the standard time I use for anything non-structural. I've done it many times without issue.

Coasting
03-04-2014, 05:06 PM
Weird... My dollar store super glue holds to the glass just fine under water when I glue my GSP to it... I would think if the water was drained a bit and the glue stuck to dry glass it would stick even better....
Plain old suction cups wont work? Could glue whatever you needed those?
If I was out that way id toss you my mag float beats chucking it in the garbage.

Reef Pilot
03-04-2014, 05:51 PM
3 hours is the standard time I use for anything non-structural. I've done it many times without issue.
OK, thanks, that is what I was looking for. So, to confirm, you're saying that after 3 hours, the silicone won't poison my tank?

Masonjames
03-04-2014, 07:57 PM
I would wait longer then 3 hours. Mind ya your not using allot but still, 3 hours seems pretty short IMO. Even 24 hrs is stretching it in my opinion. Sure the silicone may be "cured" but it will still gas off for some time after. All those fumes you smell, means a release of VOC and wether it's submerged or not that gas off is going to continue past the cure time listed on the directions. So gas off would be directly into the tank. Granted I'm sure allot have done less and seen no ill effects but always better to be safe then sorry. Most tank crashes you hear from people using the wrong silicone to re seal or build a new tank etc. Probably arnt actually a result of the wrong silicone being used. A large majority of them I guarantee are a result of all those 24hr rules. Sure it's "cured" but there will still be a significant gas off which occurs for days after. And the tank inhabitants are the ones left breathing in that wonderful fresh air. So IMO the longer you can wait the better. But again, I am sure many have had success and no problem associated with 3 hrs, 24 etc. Just wanted to express another opinion. Best of luck whichever route you choose. Might even be worth just going that mag float route as others have suggested if you can't keep your water level dropped for what you feel would be a comfortable and doable time for you and the tank.

sphelps
03-04-2014, 11:36 PM
You run much more risk not running your system for 24 hours than introducing partially uncured silicone. IMO it seems silly just talking about it. Use the right silicone and you'll be fine but don't take my word for it or any one else's for that matter.

Reef Pilot
03-04-2014, 11:58 PM
You run much more risk not running your system for 24 hours than introducing partially uncured silicone. IMO it seems silly just talking about it. Use the right silicone and you'll be fine but don't take my word for it or any one else's for that matter.
That's quite the caveat... LOL. I guess in all fairness, I would say the same. But just wondering if anyone has actually done that (3 hours), and not poisoned their tank. Of course, I will use aquarium safe silicone.

Masonjames
03-05-2014, 01:48 AM
Silicone is still silicone wether it's aquarium safe or not. I agree, shutting down a system for 24 hrs posses a heavy risk, and yes probably significantly more so then a partially uncured silicone in the amounts you would need. So I agree it would be silly to shut your system down for 24 hrs. But I also wouldn't do 3 hours myself, And no offence to those who do. Which is why I mentioned earlier about maybe exploring some of the other options that people have suggested if you personally cannot find a balance between the time you are comfortable with curing the silicone and between the time you are comfortable with having your system shut down. So if three hours works for you then by all means go ahead. If your not comfortable with that and the time you would be comfortable with is far beyond what you comfortably want to shut half your system down then maybe there's your answer. Many great alternatives have been suggested to accomplish a similar result and some which may also come with additional benefits. So everyone else's opinion aside, what is it worth to you to silicone a hook into your tank, and what if any risks are you willing to take to accomplish such, or is finding a different solution better for your situation etc.

Reef Pilot
03-05-2014, 02:12 AM
Well, I'd be really interested if anyone did it for 3 hours, and had no problems. I am not anxious to risk my tank, either.

But not sure if going 24 hours would be that bad for my tank. It is only my sump and return that would be disconnected. I would still have my in tank wavemaker pumps providing plenty of flow. And of course would have a heater.

lockrookie
03-05-2014, 02:54 AM
Here's my 2 cents if you are worried about the tank not running as in through overflow to sump scenario the main reason your concerned is the lack of oxygen in your tank. If you use your power heads to break the water surface it will help keep oxygen levels decent in the tank and for added good measure throw in an air stone or two with this you should be good to go for 24 hours without its regular flow so to speak.

If you are still concerned have a fresh batch of salt mix ready to go and in 12 hours do a waterchange to refresh the water and by then even at 12 hours the silicone should be fine it's not like you are re sealing the whole tank and have massive amounts of silicone all your using is a small dab to hold a hook.that little amount shouldn't bother anything even after 3 hours no more than using two part epoxy and crazy glue to glue frags

hillegom
03-05-2014, 04:16 AM
Here's my 2 cents if you are worried about the tank not running as in through overflow to sump scenario the main reason your concerned is the lack of oxygen in your tank. If you use your power heads to break the water surface it will help keep oxygen levels decent in the tank and for added good measure throw in an air stone or two with this you should be good to go for 24 hours without its regular flow so to speak.

If you are still concerned have a fresh batch of salt mix ready to go and in 12 hours do a waterchange to refresh the water and by then even at 12 hours the silicone should be fine it's not like you are re sealing the whole tank and have massive amounts of silicone all your using is a small dab to hold a hook.that little amount shouldn't bother anything even after 3 hours no more than using two part epoxy and crazy glue to glue frags

+1

Reef Pilot
03-05-2014, 04:23 AM
Would carbon take out any of the silicone fumes (or whatever you call the underwater equivalent)?

hillegom
03-05-2014, 05:09 AM
I thought carbon takes out a lot of "stuff"
When silicone cures it gives off acetic acid, and if I remember correctly that is vinegar.
I read somewhere where people were dosing vinegar, as a carbon source, like dosing vodka
I'm sure curing silicone also releases other chemicals, but your carbon filter should take these out.
IMHO